Elevation Control System

Keeping you at the right height

The TOOMEY Elevation Control System (ECS) gives you hassle-free grade control without the need for manual input of the blade offset as the GPS height “drifts” throughout the day. As this “drift” occurs, operators have to ‘chase’ what they feel is the correct height and that leads to much frustration and wasted machine time doing rework. It just becomes a guessing game.

There’s no question about how much GPS technology has helped the agricultural, earthmoving and surveying industries. But the challenges of the lack of consistency of the GPS elevation solution has been an ongoing frustration for many who rely on it for accurate height control. The Toomey ECS is our unique way of compensating for these changes in elevation.

TOOMEY ECS with Topcon GPS at Griffith, NSW.

TOOMEY ECS with Topcon GPS at Griffith, NSW.


Why is there a TOOMEY ECS – It’s all about making grading less stressful for everyone involved in using GPS for grade control and surveying.

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Ray Oxley, Leeton, NSW working near Darlington Point, NSW where the average day temperature tops above 40C during summer and when uncompensated GPS is practically useless for any sort of grade control.


TOOMEY ECS – The Evolution of Elevation Compensation System

The first concept trial for a compensation system was secretly done in California, February 2016 with some help from Mark Dessert, El Centro. Mark, had a cache of all sorts of bits and pieces of GPS and machine control gear that after some modifications and changes proved that the idea would work in practice…..

The first concept trial for a compensation system was secretly done in California, February 2016 with some help from Mark Dessert, El Centro. Mark, had a cache of all sorts of bits and pieces of GPS and machine control gear that after some modifications and changes proved that the idea would work in practice…..


…..and into the field it went for some machine trials. Needless to say the scraper blade stayed sub-6mm (1/4”) repeatable for all of the 3 day job.

…..and into the field it went for some machine trials. Needless to say the scraper blade stayed sub-6mm (1/4”) repeatable for all of the 3 day job.

Ben Renfrey trialing the first release ECS in the Ord River Irrigation Area, Kununurra, WA, Australia.

Ben Renfrey trialing the first release ECS in the Ord River Irrigation Area, Kununurra, WA, Australia.